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Nelson Mandela was a giant, a colossus who seemed to stand astride history and above the everyday. His passing at the age of 95 is being marked by expressions of condolence and admiration from around the world. As I’ve reflected on this man’s life, I’m drawn to how he managed to emerge from unspeakable pain …

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The Fort Worth Star Telegram issued four “Extras” on November 22, 1963, the day President John F. Kennedy died. The driving force was a 26 year-old cub reporter by the name of Bob Schieffer. [I am personally grateful to Mr. Schieffer for another reason—but I’ll get to that in a bit.] Bob Schieffer happened to …

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Vinny is one of my grandsons (I have six, and one granddaughter—thanks for asking). He’s seven years old. The other day, as he showed me a screen and explained the latest level he’d reached in a game I didn’t know or understand, I was struck by the thought that I was exactly his age when …

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Though this time of year the big-four of sports are all up and running—baseball, football, basketball, and hockey—to my mind it’s still baseball season until Yogi Berra’s famous benediction is pronounced: “It ‘aint over ‘til it’s over.” The man was a wordsmith. This year, I find myself thinking a lot about what was going on …

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[This column was written for TOWNHALL.COM — DRS] Hollywood put out some great movies in 1939, films such as Gone With the Wind, The Wizard of Oz, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, and The Hunchback of Notre Dame. But one movie that year—now largely forgotten—served a purpose even greater than helping a Depression-ravaged American public …

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One day in 1974, as Spring began to give way to Summer, Frank Gannon—wordsmith and White House Fellow—took a walk in Washington, largely to get away from the stress induced by the Nixon White House’s ever-increasing Watergate milieu. He found his way to an old theater—one that happened to be featuring a triple billing of …

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  [I wrote this blog post for VENTURE GALLERIES — DRS] Larissa MacFarquhar, writing in the New Yorker last year called historical fiction, “a hybrid form, half-way between fiction and nonfiction. It is pioneer country, without fixed laws.”  My observation is that sometimes historical fiction leans more to the latter, other times to the former. …

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